Climate Action Plan

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On July 15, 2014, the City Council voted unanimously 5-0  to adopt the Climate Action Plan.

City Council Staff Report and Resolution

Final Climate Action Plan – July 2014

Background

In November 2009, the City adopted a General Plan/Coastal Land Use Plan (General Plan) amendment to include Implementation Action CE-IA-5, requiring a greenhouse gas (GHG) inventory and related plan, otherwise known as a Climate Action Plan or CAP. Implementation Action CE-IA-5 outlines the minimum requirements of a CAP, which includes a GHG emissions inventory, a 2020 and 2030 emissions forecast, and measures to reduce emissions. In 2011, staff initiated the preparation of a CAP to meet the requirements of the General Plan.

The City’s CAP reflects the statewide reduction goal outlined in Assembly Bill 32 (AB 32), also known as the Global Warming Solutions Act of 2006 (Health & Safety Code, § 38500 et seq.). AB 32 specifically calls for a statewide reduction of GHG emissions to 1990 levels by 2020. The State legislation requires that the California Air Resources Board (CARB) prepare a Scoping Plan that describes the approach California will take to reduce GHGs to achieve the goal of AB 32. The Scoping Plan for AB 32, developed and implemented by the CARB, identifies specific measures to achieve these reductions and recommends that local governments establish GHG reduction targets for both their municipal operations and the community that are consistent with those of the State.

The City’s CAP meets the requirements of AB 32 and Executive Order S-3-05. The CAP utilizes the baseline year of 2007 and forecasts emissions for 2020 and 2030. The City worked with consultants to utilize local data and growth projections to develop forecasted emissions in order to be consistent with the planning horizon of the General Plan. The City identified candidate reduction measures to reduce emissions via a survey conducted with members of the various departments within the City. Once the baseline and forecast emissions were calculated and a candidate measures list was established, the City calculated the emission reductions each candidate measure would achieve in 2020. This information was presented in a public workshop on September 19, 2013. A second public workshop on November 21, 2013 provided the public with an update of the previous materials presented as well as a cost-benefit analysis for the candidate measures. At both public workshops, City staff received feedback on various aspects of the CAP.

The Governor’s Office of Planning and Research (OPR) prepared a list of plans and initiatives adopted by California jurisdictions to address climate change. This information is from OPR's 2012 and 2013 Annual Planning Survey and augmented with personal interviews in 2016. Information on the City's efforts can be found on page 5 of the list that can be downloaded HERE.